The only trends worth following? Recycling and repairing.

Here's a not-so-fun fact: Today, less than 1% of the materials used to make clothes get recycled each year. This means that thousands of tonnes of textiles end up in landfills. By reusing or recycling fashion, we can turn that around.

Our Garment Collecting programme is the world's biggest of its kind. It was rolled out globally in 2013.

Over 10% of a garment's total impact on the climate happens after you've left the store. Things like how often you wash your clothes or if you toss them in the rubbish instead of recycling, have an effect. So, how you take care of them really matters! Learn how you can make your clothes last longer with our Take Care concept, available in all online stores.

Our Garment Collecting programme has been going since 2013 and we have recycling boxes in our stores across the globe. It works like this:

1. Take any unwanted clothes or textiles, by any brand and in any condition, to one of our stores.

2. Hand in your bag of old clothes at the cash desk and receive a thank you voucher to use towards your next purchase. Easy!

Once you've dropped off your previously loved fashion in one of our garment collecting boxes, our business partner I:CO takes over. They empty the boxes and sort the contents into three categories:

Rewear: Wearable clothes are marketed as second-hand clothing.

Re-use: If the clothes or textiles are not suitable for rewear they're turned into other products, such as remake collections or cleaning cloths.

Recycle: All other clothes and textiles are shredded into textile fibres and used to make insulation materials for example.

Last year we launched a rental service in one of our stores in Stockholm where you can rent selected outfits from our Conscious Exclusive collections. You can own the look, without owning the garment. Genius!

Did you know?

In 2019, we collected 29 005 tonnes of unwanted clothes and textiles through our Garment Collecting programme. That's 40% more than last year and represents the equivalent of 145 million T-shirts.

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